The cayambis connection

The cayambis connection

Posted at Nov 19, 2015 | Posted in: Participaciones, Prensa | By: fede | No comments

I would like to share the cayambis connection composers´news!

Federico Núñez reports that he just returned to his home in Argentina after having attended the Second International Guitar Festival that was held in Santiago, Chile from November 12th through the 14th. He also informed us that his septet, Páramos, composed during his 2013 residency in the Antarctic, will be receiving its premier performance by the Tropi Ensamble on November 28 in Buenos Aires.

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Convention Report

We traveled to Raleigh, North Carolina, where we participated in the Raleigh Area Flute Association flute fair. In addition to welcoming our newest sub- scribers, we’d like to say that we had a good time and are looking forward to our next convention event.

Gómez  - Resolana (Diana Montoya, percusión)
Gómez, Resolana.
Diana Montoya, percussion.

New Titles!

Here are some of the new titles added to our catalog during the last month. From Puerto Rico, Armando Luis Ramírez’s Four Folkloric Etudes for piccolo; Prelude and Toccata for guitar by Peruvian composer Sadiel Cuentas; Venezuelan Luis Pérez Valero composed a delightfully accessible piece for flute and guitar, In Memory of a Calico Kitten; from Panama we got a percussion solo work, And the Wind Sings Along, by Carlos Camacho; for solo cello, May the Lord Grant You Peace, by Brazilian Fernando Oliveira; and lastly, Gabriel Yela’s Furia Sentimentale for flute and piano. All are published and ready for sale.

We Have Mail!

Elizabeth Crone, who teaches flute at Virginia Tech, wrote to let us know that she recently worked on Samuel Robles’s Dos miniaturaswith one of her under- graduate students. She says that this piece “is perfect to work on various technical abilities, such as playing long phrases, moving evenly between large intervals, and keeping a light, continuous style.” She went on to recommend the work as something “short and fun” for any recital program.
If you have any comments (good ones, we hope!) about our pieces we’d love to include them in future editions of our newsletter.Write to us and let us know!

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Our Composers in the News

News from Chile leads our monthly report on our composers’ activities. On October 24, Nicolás Kliwadenko was awarded a first prize by the Luis Advis Composition Competition for his string sextet,Indiferente baile imposible. The work was premiered in Coquimbo that same day by the symphony orchestra of La Serena University under the baton of Pablo Carrasco.
On October 25 Miguel Santaella’s work, Laudatio, inspired by the third movement of Stravinsky’s Symphony of Psalms, was awarded a second prize in the Ricciotti Ensemble’s arrangements competition. The group premiered the work that same day at the Melkweg Cultural Center in Amsterdam.
Flutist Fernando Martínez performed Luis Ernesto Gómez’s Two Thalassic Canticles (Dos cánticos acuáticos) at the Museum of Contemporary Art in Caracas on November 1 during a music festival held in that city. On November 8 Gómez’s work, Resolana para solo de percusión, was premiered at the Galpones Art Center in Caracas by Diana Montoya (see sidebar).
Federico Núñez reports that he just returned to his home in Argentina after having attended the Second International Guitar Festival that was held in Santiago, Chile from November 12th through the 14th. He also informed us that his septet, Páramos, composed during his 2013 residency in the Antarctic, will be receiving its premier performance by the Tropi Ensamble on November 28 in Buenos Aires.
Kent Holliday recently spent November 14-15 at Radford University as a consultant for British pianist Martin Jones’s recording of three of his works. A compact disk of these compositions, which includesToccata Diabolica, is expected be released by MahinMusic next year.
Luis Pérez Valero has been invited to guest conduct the symphony orchestra of the Carabobo Conservatory on November 28. His program will include English works for chorus and orchestra by John Rutter, Sir Edward Elgar, Arthur Harris and Ralph Vaughan Williams.
Finally, we are pleased to report that one of Alba Triana’s works was featured as one of four case studies of 21st century composition in a new book by Nina Sun Eidsheim, Sensing Sound: Singing and Listening as Vibrational Practice, that was recently published by Duke University Press.

This Really Happened

Francisco Rosa was an Italian pianist, conductor and occasional impresario who spent nearly his entire professional career in the Americas and Asia. Near the end of 1879 he organized an opera company for the Mexican opera star, Angela Peralta, that debuted on January 10, 1880 in Mexico City. By early May 1882 the company was in Zacatecas, where it experienced a rather unusual personnel issue:
Evidently Rosa and baritone Vincenzo Villani has gotten so upset with each other that the latter supposedly fatally wounded Rosa by shooting him in the stomach in a duel. Over the course of the next few days the bizarre story was not only published in newspapers throughout Mexico, but also a condensed version was even printed in Galveston, Texas. But the news of Rosa’s death was premature. In fact, the Italian sent a telegram to a Mexico City newspaper that indicated that although he was in perfect health, Villani was not. Who or what had caused so much upset? In that telegram were two important clues, the first that Rosa was madly in love with contralto Giuseppina Zeppilli; the second, that she was actually planning on marrying Villani!

Edson Beltrami’s Imagens cariocas
Performed by the SaxBrasil saxophone quartet.

Student Corner

Latin American classical music oftentimes incorporates local or regional influences. On occasion, fellow North Americans will tell us that these unfamiliar elements, and especially Latin American rhythms, make them a little reluctant to add this sort of music to their playlist. However, by using Adriana Verdié’s wind quintet,Tangoescente, we’d like to show you that perhaps a little hesitancy is not that hard to overcome.
Like most Latin American dance-like genres the tango is built around a stereotypical rhythm. Instead of rhythm, however, in TangoescenteVerdié focuses more on the tango’s timbral characteristics. For example, she has the flute mimic the chicharra (chee-CHAW-rah), which is a scratchy rhythmic effect produced by the violin in a tango group. (See, you’re already starting to sound like a tanguero!) In any event, as flutist Jessica Quiñones rightly points out, the essential characteristic of the tango is its strongly improvisational nature. In other words, trying to limit your creativity to fit a certain preconceived notion would not necessarily be a good thing.
Our recommendation would be to simply listen to the tango and other similar types of songs, read about them, but more than anything else, just enjoy playing the many classical music pieces that have been inspired by Latin American dance.

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